Posts Tagged ‘Education’

Music Monday at Y.E.S!

Monday, July 9th, 2018

Music is a great way to teach counting skills with pre-school aged children for several reasons. First, children (and adults!) learn by auditory, visual or kinesthetic input and some children learn better with one of the three styles. Second, as any parent will tell you, children pick up songs very quickly and memorize the lines. The Ants Go Marching song is a great example of using song to teach counting and math to auditory learners.

What ways can we adapt this song for visual and kinesthetic learners? By printing the lyrics or watching video (visual), using hand signals or having children jump a certain number of times (kinetic), we can teach to each learning style in a fun, interactive and energy-burning way.

 

Introducing Y.E.S! Owner/Director Therese DiVerde

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2018

therese-diverde-yes-ownerJuly 2, 2018

Dear Parents/Guardians and Staff,

It is my distinct pleasure to inform you that I am the new Owner/Director of Young Explorers School and my name is Therese DiVerde. Building meaningful relationships and getting to know each other is my top priority. I am honored that Dr. Fil has entrusted me with serving all of you and while I know it will be tough to fill her shoes, I look forward to this important chapter in my life.

Change is often scary and it raises many emotions and questions. I would like to try and put your mind at ease by saying that any changes made will be slow, steady and purposeful and I welcome any and all input from the staff and parents (and the kids too!). In the very near future, I will be sending a survey home so that I can collect some data that will help guide me as we move forward.

A little bit about me….

  • I was born and raised outside of Chicago and moved to Tucson in 1981 (that makes me a native right?)
  • I am the 8th child of 12 so being around noise and kids is what I thrive on. We lost both of our amazing parents within the last 2 years after 72 years of marriage.
  • I have 28 nieces and nephews (not counting their spouses) and over 30 great nieces and nephews. I have been surrounded by kids my entire life.
  • I am the mother of 3 kids… one of each. (One of each you say?) I raised my stepson from the age of 4. I have a birth son and my youngest is my adopted daughter who was one of my students when I taught 7th
  • All three of my kids are married and each has 2 of their own children, so that makes me a “granny” of 6. One of my grandsons will soon be enrolling at Young Explorers.
  • I have a degree in Elementary Education which I earned in my 30’s. I taught 7th and 8th grade math in TUSD. I also worked as an Instructional Coach as well and have trained and developed many teachers and I love and respect the hard work and dedication of teachers.
  • I have a master’s degree in Educational Leadership and worked for Ombudsman Charter Schools as an administrator in Tucson, Phoenix and Las Vegas.
  • I once was a partner in a real estate development company so I have valuable experience operating a business. My passion however is and always will be working with children and their families.
  • I love to travel, I love to cook, I love to read, I love 70’s and 80’s rock, I love musicals and live theater, I love boating and I especially love to laugh.

I appreciate your patience, understanding and I promise to work relentlessly to make this transition as seamless as possible. I look forward to meeting each and every one of you.

Sincerely,

Therese DiVerde

Pieces of the puzzle

Thursday, June 28th, 2018

puzzles are a great learning tool for young childrenPuzzles provide educational value for children of all ages

A baby learns to recognize objects by their shape and not necessarily what position the object is in. A chair is a chair whether it is upright, lying down, or upside down-it doesn’t matter. The simple puzzles produced for younger children develop more refined and defined skills and recognition.

One of the first things a young child will learn is that it does matter which way up the pieces to fit in the hole. A typical early childhood puzzle is wooden with a picture and has spaces where the pieces fit to complete the picture. With a street scene, for example, there might be a separate car shape, bus shape, and a truck shape that complete a puzzle. These puzzles are typically robust as the first response of a child is to try to force the piece into place taking no notice of its shape. With adult guidance the young child learns to manipulate the piece until it does fit exactly.

There are several learning experiences that can be drawn from these very basic puzzles. Firstly it’s the hand eye coordination to manipulate the puzzle piece into position. To get the piece in also involves observation of the shape of the hole and the shape of the puzzle piece. At first the child deals with the problem by trial and error. The example and guidance of an adult begins to solidify the thinking process. The child starts to apply spatial awareness and mental manipulation as well as physical. This comes however, after the child has learned to put the piece in correctly through trial and error and memory.

The role of the adult at this stage is very important. The conversation about the picture, talking and demonstrating the correct method to complete it, accelerates the child’s learning process. Puzzles can create a great opportunity for increase in vocabulary, and recognition of objects and situations outside the child’s immediate world. The fact that the child learns that the piece only fits one way is in fact a pre reading skill. A letter needs to be the right way up and not backwards or upside down in a word.

These early childhood puzzles can be purchased in varying degrees of difficulty as the child’s spatial and reasoning skills become more developed. The child also learns through puzzles the recognition of color and shape with, of course, adult conversation increasing the potential of the child’s understanding and development. The green shape only fits in the green hole. This type of matching activity develops early reading skills.

At this stage it is good to introduce a new puzzle and do it with the child at first. Make this a happy social time and lots of fun. Do the puzzles with the child long enough to maintain the child’s interest and attention, but be ready to move on to another activity. Eventually when the child’s dexterity and confidence has increased, he will want to do it by himself. With praise and encouragement the child will practice until the skills become familiar. Then is the time to introduce puzzles with greater challenge.

Puzzles help develop the reasoning and deduction process of thinking. As well as skills such as spatial awareness, matching and sorting. Above all, puzzles present a great opportunity for language development and a happy social interaction with your child.

Why music education?

Monday, June 18th, 2018

music education for the whole child developmentMusic helps develop the whole child

At Young Explorers, we’ve been offering music education for more than 40 years. We believe that music is just as important as math, reading and play when developing the whole child.

Take a look at the benefits of raising a music lover, and find out how to share your love of music with your child.

Benefits of Music Education: 

  1. Enhance academic performance. Some studies have shown that kids who can play instruments receive higher SAT scores. Engaging with music involves math, science, and memory skills, as well as motor coordination.

  2. Explore other cultures. Even if your knowledge of French is limited to Frere Jacques, you realize how rhymes make it easier to speak other languages. Music also provides a window into how others live around the world.

  3. Promote teamwork. Bands and orchestras collaborate and resolve challenges. Each member waits their turn and respects the others’ contributions.
  4. Teach delayed gratification. Video games like Guitar Hero may be fun, but they don’t really teach you to play guitar. Kids who practice with a real instrument experience the rewards of perseverance.

  5. Build confidence. Racking up tangible accomplishments boosts self-esteem. Performing before a live audience can also be an early lesson in leadership and presentation abilities.

Encouraging Your Child’s Music Appreciation:

  1. Start early. Many experts think that the capacity for musical sensibility peaks between birth and age, nine so use age-appropriate methods. Your baby loves the sound of your voice, so chant while you rock them. Encourage your toddler to make noise with homemade shakers and drums.
  2. Sing together. Babies will often mimic any sound you make, while slightly older kids will enjoy silly songs. By the time they’re ready for elementary school, you can start introducing simple concepts like tempo and beat.
  3. Share activities. Keep it interesting with crafts and outings. Draw pictures of instruments to color, and check neighborhood calendars for children’s performances.

  4. Broaden their exposure. Drench your home in pleasant sounds. Play classical music and jazz on the radio. Offer sheet music and books. 

Supporting Your Child’s Music Studies:

  1. Talk with the teacher. Choose a music instructor with a warm personality who can describe their lesson plan in convincing detail. Ask them how you can assist your child, especially if you don’t know much about music yourself.

  2. Attend classes. Your child might feel more comfortable if you go with them to classes at first. Try to observe closely without distracting them from listening to the teacher.

  3. Praise effort. Let your child know you recognize their progress. Be specific about what they’re doing well, whether it’s practicing on a daily basis or playing an entire piece without hitting a single wrong note.

  4. Show enthusiasm. Show up for each performance that you possibly can. Give a big round of applause and take pictures for posterity. Help your child stay on track by engaging them in setting daily goals and figuring out activities of their own for holiday breaks and summer vacation.

  5. Make it fun. Remember that the main purpose is to help your child enjoy music, so let them decide how far they want to go. Let them know you love them just as much if they want to trade in their piano lessons for horseback riding.

Make symphonies and pop songs part of your family activities. Increasing your child’s understanding of music will enhance their performance in many arenas, and give them a source of joy and relaxation they can count on throughout their lives.

February 2018 Family Newsletter

Thursday, February 8th, 2018

Valentines Day PartyDear Y.E.S! Families,

February is a very short month but it is definitely action packed. Check these exciting events and be sure to join us if possible.

Valentine’s Day Party: Wednesday, Feb. 14

Our party will begin at 9:45 a.m. and continue to 11 a.m. We will have story time, music, games and Valentines!

If you would like your child to bring in Valentines for the party, please bring them in on or before Feb. 13. This will give the children a chance to deliver them to the Valentine Bags. Have your child sign them “To my Friend: from their name. This is a real wonderful opportunity to encourage your child to notice letters and recognition skills too.

Visual Screening with Lions Club, Thursday Feb. 15 at 9 a.m.

This is a great opportunity for your child to have their eyes screened. The process is very simple and quick. You may get more information about the process by checking the Lions website. There is a video and explanation.  If you do not want your child’s eyes screened, please let us know. We can have a signup sheet for you to let us know. Check out the video at https//www.eclubhouse.org.

Also, if you have pairs of old glasses that you have been wondering what to do with them, this is your chance to donate them to the Lions Club. They are able to recycle them for people who are in need of glasses. We will have a box for your donations.

Friday, Annual Rodeo Party, Friday, Feb. 23

We will have special cowboy beans and cornbread for lunch. The Rocking Star Ranch Ponies will be here to give the children pony rides. The festivities will begin after breakfast. Parents and friends are invited to join us for lunch. We will post a reservation sign up list.

Quality First LogoQuality First Update

Our staff enjoyed the training session last Saturday with our coach Josi Terrell. Our goal is to learn more about the standards for the program. It is always exciting to learn.  We are looking forward to our next visit. We will keep you posted. There have been many changes in the program so it will be interesting to see the new process.

Curriculum Corner

Valentine’s Day is an excellent way to encourage your child’s literacy skills. Take time when the children bring home their Valentines to read them and discuss the words and letters. Have your child dictate their greetings to grandparents and special friends. If you would like your child to know what happens with “snail mail,” you might even mail your child a card so that they can have the experience of going to the mail box. If you would like to mail a Valentine to your child at school, address it to your child care of Young Explorers School, P.O. Box 14614, 85732.

Take advantage of your time during your drive to and from school to encourage your child to look for letters. Children know a lot of words because they have experienced them. Most children recognize M for McDonalds and other restaurants too. Every day each of us have the opportunity to encourage children to become aware of the “reading environments”! By encouraging your child to share their recognition skills you can begin to see an emerging eager reader! Enjoying reading is the goal!

I hope you picked up the YES! Valentine Song Flyer. We will be singing our songs daily and at our Valentine’s Day Party too. This might help you understand some of the words your child may be singing.

Happy Valentine’s Day for all!

Dr. Fil.

Celebrating 47 YearsYoung Explorers SchoolP.S. Thank you for attending our 47th Birthday Party last week. It was quite a turn out. Many friends and family made the event very rewarding. Taking time to remember our past encourages us to continue to provide nurturing and educational learning opportunities daily for our children.