Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

Music Monday at Y.E.S!

Monday, July 9th, 2018

Music is a great way to teach counting skills with pre-school aged children for several reasons. First, children (and adults!) learn by auditory, visual or kinesthetic input and some children learn better with one of the three styles. Second, as any parent will tell you, children pick up songs very quickly and memorize the lines. The Ants Go Marching song is a great example of using song to teach counting and math to auditory learners.

What ways can we adapt this song for visual and kinesthetic learners? By printing the lyrics or watching video (visual), using hand signals or having children jump a certain number of times (kinetic), we can teach to each learning style in a fun, interactive and energy-burning way.

 

Why music education?

Monday, June 18th, 2018

music education for the whole child developmentMusic helps develop the whole child

At Young Explorers, we’ve been offering music education for more than 40 years. We believe that music is just as important as math, reading and play when developing the whole child.

Take a look at the benefits of raising a music lover, and find out how to share your love of music with your child.

Benefits of Music Education: 

  1. Enhance academic performance. Some studies have shown that kids who can play instruments receive higher SAT scores. Engaging with music involves math, science, and memory skills, as well as motor coordination.

  2. Explore other cultures. Even if your knowledge of French is limited to Frere Jacques, you realize how rhymes make it easier to speak other languages. Music also provides a window into how others live around the world.

  3. Promote teamwork. Bands and orchestras collaborate and resolve challenges. Each member waits their turn and respects the others’ contributions.
  4. Teach delayed gratification. Video games like Guitar Hero may be fun, but they don’t really teach you to play guitar. Kids who practice with a real instrument experience the rewards of perseverance.

  5. Build confidence. Racking up tangible accomplishments boosts self-esteem. Performing before a live audience can also be an early lesson in leadership and presentation abilities.

Encouraging Your Child’s Music Appreciation:

  1. Start early. Many experts think that the capacity for musical sensibility peaks between birth and age, nine so use age-appropriate methods. Your baby loves the sound of your voice, so chant while you rock them. Encourage your toddler to make noise with homemade shakers and drums.
  2. Sing together. Babies will often mimic any sound you make, while slightly older kids will enjoy silly songs. By the time they’re ready for elementary school, you can start introducing simple concepts like tempo and beat.
  3. Share activities. Keep it interesting with crafts and outings. Draw pictures of instruments to color, and check neighborhood calendars for children’s performances.

  4. Broaden their exposure. Drench your home in pleasant sounds. Play classical music and jazz on the radio. Offer sheet music and books. 

Supporting Your Child’s Music Studies:

  1. Talk with the teacher. Choose a music instructor with a warm personality who can describe their lesson plan in convincing detail. Ask them how you can assist your child, especially if you don’t know much about music yourself.

  2. Attend classes. Your child might feel more comfortable if you go with them to classes at first. Try to observe closely without distracting them from listening to the teacher.

  3. Praise effort. Let your child know you recognize their progress. Be specific about what they’re doing well, whether it’s practicing on a daily basis or playing an entire piece without hitting a single wrong note.

  4. Show enthusiasm. Show up for each performance that you possibly can. Give a big round of applause and take pictures for posterity. Help your child stay on track by engaging them in setting daily goals and figuring out activities of their own for holiday breaks and summer vacation.

  5. Make it fun. Remember that the main purpose is to help your child enjoy music, so let them decide how far they want to go. Let them know you love them just as much if they want to trade in their piano lessons for horseback riding.

Make symphonies and pop songs part of your family activities. Increasing your child’s understanding of music will enhance their performance in many arenas, and give them a source of joy and relaxation they can count on throughout their lives.

More than a melody: how music contributes to early childhood learning

Monday, March 26th, 2018

music education is key to early childhood learningMusic education is key for early childhood education

We have all had the experience of listening to the radio when a song comes on that you haven’t heard in 10, 15, or 20 years. But right away you start to sing along like you heard it yesterday, you don’t miss a single word.

Kids are no different. Those songs like Wheels on the Bus and The Itsy Bitsy Spider help your child learn simple concepts through repetition. Singing along to these simple songs helps them to become familiar with new words and concepts. The Old McDonald song helps young children learn the sounds that animals make and there are songs that help with numbers and colors.

Music is a magical gift that should be shared at an early age, especially now that scientific evidence proves that children who have been exposed to music at an early age do better at math and science.
The evidence is compelling that music and singing have a positive impact on all aspects of child learning and development.

Research indicates the brain of a musician, even a young one, works differently than that of a nonmusician. “There’s some good neuroscience research that children involved in music have larger growth of neural activity than people not in music training. When you’re a musician and you’re playing an instrument, you have to be using more of your brain,” says Dr. Eric Rasmussen, chair of the Early Childhood Music Department at the Peabody Preparatory of The Johns Hopkins University, where he teaches a specialized music curriculum for children aged two months to nine years.

Singing also helps young children feel confident and less shy around the other children. And when you add fun hand motions and wiggles to the song the kids really come to life. And if you really want to add some spice, give children some simple musical instruments. Tamboreens, bells and bongos and kazoos are very easy for children to use and they absolutely love to play them. Exposing them to music at an early age is will encourage their love for music as they grow.

At Y.E.S! we have our favorites like Going on a Bear Hunt, which we sing at our annual camping trip at Mt. Lemmon. What are some your favorite songs for pre-schoolers?